FAQ

How will segments 5 and 6 of SH 130 be paid for?
Why are toll roads needed in Texas?
Why should I pay tolls when I’m already paying taxes to build roads?
Is SH 130 two different roads?
Where will segments 5 and 6 of SH 130 be located?
What is the configuration for segments 5 and 6 of SH 130?
When will segments 5 and 6 of SH 130 be complete?
How much did the construction of SH 130 cost?
How much are the tolls?
How will tolls be collected on segments 5 and 6 of SH 130?
What is the speed limit of SH 130 Segments 5 & 6?

How will segments 5 and 6 of SH 130 be paid for?

On June 30, 2006 the Texas Department of Transportation announced approval of the state’s first concession agreement – a $1.3 billion private investment by the SH 130 Concession Company to build the remaining 41 miles of State Highway 130. Per the agreement, the SH 130 Concession Company will provide the funds necessary to complete segments 5 & 6 of SH 130 from Austin to Seguin. They also agree to pay millions of dollars for right of way costs, thus lifting the financial burden from Caldwell, Guadalupe and Travis counties.


Why are toll roads needed in Texas?

Planners have identified $188 billion in needed projects to achieve an acceptable level of mobility by 2030. The Texas Department of Transportation estimates that only $102 billion will be available to meet those needs, leaving a significant funding gap of $86 billion. The traditional tax-based method of financing roads is no longer sufficient to handle the state’s mobility needs in a timely fashion. Developing roads as tollways will stretch limited taxpayer dollars and accelerate construction of highway projects, resulting in congestion relief for motorists, sooner rather than later.


Why should I pay tolls when I’m already paying taxes to build roads?

Texas has one of the lowest state gas taxes in the nation but that revenue only pay for 32% of our current state transportation budget. In addition, as many as 30,000 people move to Texas every month and the number of registered vehicles continues to rise. This has resulted in the need for more roads to keep pace with the demand on our strained highway system. We must utilize all financial options, including tollways, which offer an alternative method of financing for needed highway projects. In addition, relying only on gas taxes to pay for roads means taking 10 – 25 years to build new highways and make overdue improvements. By borrowing money that will be repaid with user tolls, we can build the roads we need now.


Is SH 130 two different roads?

No. The northern (Segments 1-4) and southern (Segments 5-6) portions of SH 130 are being built at different times, by different teams, under different agreements with TxDOT, but the road itself is continuous. The entire 91-mile SH 130 project, from Georgetown to Seguin, has received federal approval. All segments of SH 130 are being designed to incorporate the same aesthetic and functional elements, including fully interoperable toll systems, and travel between the various segments will be seamless.


Where will segments 5 and 6 of SH 130 be located?

Segments 5 and 6 of SH 130 begin in Mustang Ridge, travel through three counties-Travis, Caldwell, Guadalupe (approximately 41 miles)-and connect to IH 10 in Seguin.


What is the  configuration for segments 5 and 6 of SH 130?

The configuration for Segments 5 and 6 is as follows:

Segment 5 consists of a four lane divided toll highway with a two toll lanes in each direction and two continuous frontage roads in each direction. It includes a direct connect interchange at the connection of SH 130/SH 45 SE. This interchange includes the following connections:

SH 45 to SH 130
SH 130 to SH 45
SH 130 Segment 5 to SH 130 Segment 4
SH 130 Segment 4 to SH 130 Segment 5

Segment 5 provides grade-separated crossings at the following locations: New Laws Road, New Lockhart Road (CR 176), SH 21, CR 179, CR 222, FM 1185. It provides ramps from and onto the non-toll lanes at the following locations: North of New Laws Road, between New Lockhart Road and SH 21, between SH 21 and CR 179, between CR 179 and CR 222, and between CR 222 and FM 1185.

Segment 6 consists of a four lane divided toll highway with two lanes in each direction and two continuous frontage roads in each direction up to CR 217. There is no frontage road south of CR 217.

Direct connect interchanges are provided at the following locations in Segment 6:

US 183 to SH 130
SH 130 to US 183
SH 130 to IH 10
IH 10 to SH 130

Segment 6 also includes grade-separated crossings at the following locations: FM 2001, UPRR #1 (existing track), SH 142, CR 108, CR 218, CR 217, CR 109, SH 80, FM 621, CR 242, CR 241, FM 3353, FM 20, CR 119, UPRR #2 (existing track) and US 90.

It provides ramps from and onto the non-toll lanes between FM 1185 and the Interchange with US 183, between the interchange with US 183 and FM 2001, between FM 2001 and SH 142, between CR 108 and CR 218 and between CR 218 and CR 217. Direct connecting ramps to the toll lanes are provided at SH 80, FM 621, FM 20 and the north side of US 90.


How much did the construction of SH 130 Cost?

The expected completion date for SH 130 Segments 5 & 6 is late 2012.


How much will SH 130 cost?

SH 130 Segments 5 & 6 were built at zero cost to taxpayers.  The estimated cost for SH 130 Segments 5 and 6 is currently $1.4 billion, including right of way acquisition, utility relocation, and improvements to connecting streets and roads, as well as the construction cost of the highway itself.


How much are the tolls?

Please see our posted rates here.


How will tolls be collected on segments 5 and 6 of SH 130?

Segments 5 & 6 of SH 130 will have an all-electronic toll collection system, allowing motorists to travel at highway speeds without stopping at toll plazas and looking for coins. Drivers will be able to pay their tolls with TxTag, a small electronic sticker that attaches to the windshield and automatically deducts toll fees from a prepaid account.


What is the speed limit on SH 130 Segments 5 & 6?

The Texas Department of Transportation has determined that SH 130 Segments 5 and 6 may be safely traveled at 85 miles per hour.